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Faq

  • What is an IPO?

    An Initial Public Offer (IPO) is a means of collecting money from the public by a company for the first time in the market to fund its projects. In return, the company gives the share to the investors in the company.
  • What is a draft prospectus?

    A draft prospectus provides the information on the financials of the company, promoters, background, tentative issue price etc. It is filed by the Lead Managers with the Securities & Exchange Board of India (SEBI) to provide issue details. Overview of the draft prospectus can be seen on www.sebi.gov.in (SEBIs web site). The final prospectus is printed after obtaining the clearance from SEBI and the Registrar of Companies (ROC).
  • What is Differential pricing?

    Pricing of an issue where one category is offered shares at a price different from the other category is called differential pricing. In DIP Guidelines differential pricing is allowed only if the securities to applicants in the firm allotment category is at a price higher than the price at which the net offer to the public is made. The net offer to the public means the offer made to the Indian public and does not include firm allotments or reservations or promoters contributions.
  • What is the role of a registrar?

    The Registrar finalizes the list of eligible allottees after deleting the invalid applications and ensures that the corporate action for crediting of shares to the demat accounts of the applicants is done and the dispatch of refund orders to those applicable are sent. The Lead manager coordinates with the Registrar to ensure follow up so that that the flow of applications from collecting bank branches, processing of the applications and other matters till the basis of allotment is finalized, dispatch security certificates and refund orders completed and securities listed.
  • What is repo rate and reverse repo rate?

    Repo or repurchase option is a means of short-term borrowing, wherein banks sell approved government securities to RBI and get funds in exchange. In other words, in a repo transaction, RBI repurchases government securities from banks, depending on the level of money supply it decides to maintain in the country's monetary system.

    Repo rate is the discount rate at which banks borrow from RBI. Reduction in repo rate will help banks to get money at a cheaper rate, while increase in repo rate will make bank borrowings from RBI more expensive. If RBI wants to make it more expensive for the banks to borrow money, it increases the repo rate. Similarly, if it wants to make it cheaper for banks to borrow money, it reduces the repo rate.

    Reverse repo is the exact opposite of repo. In a reverse repo transaction, banks purchase government securities form RBI and lend money to the banking regulator, thus earning interest. Reverse repo rate is the rate at which RBI borrows money from banks. Banks are always happy to lend money to RBI since their money is in safe hands with a good interest.

    Thus, repo rate is always higher than the reverse repo rate.

    Source: sptulsian.com
  • What is the pay-in day and pay- out day?

    Pay in day is the day when the brokers shall make payment or delivery of securities to the exchange. Pay out day is the day when the exchange makes payment or delivery of securities to the broker. Settlement cycle is on T+2 rolling settlement basis w.e.f. April 01, 2003. The exchanges have to ensure that the pay out of funds and securities to the clients is done by the broker within 24 hours of the payout. The Exchanges will have to issue press release immediately after pay out.
  • What are Risk Factors?

    Here, the issuers management gives its view on the Internal and external risks faced by the company. Here, the company also makes a note on the forward-looking statements. This information is disclosed in the initial pages of the document and it is also clearly disclosed in the abridged prospectus. It is generally advised that the investors should go through all the risk factors of the company before making an investment decision.
  • Am I required to sign any agreement with the broker or sub-broker?

    Yes. For the purpose of engaging a broker to execute trades on your behalf from time to time and furnish details relating to yourself for enabling the broker to maintain client registration form you have to sign the Member - Client agreement if you are dealing directly with a broker. In case you are dealing through a sub-broker then you have to sign a Broker - Sub broker - Client Tripartite Agreement. Model Tripartite Agreement between Broker-Sub broker and Clients is applicable only for the cash segment. The Model Agreement has to be executed on the non-judicial stamp paper. The Agreement contains clauses defining the rights and responsibility of Client vis--vis broker/ sub broker. The documents prescribed are model formats. The stock exchanges/stock broker may incorporate any additional clauses in these documents provided these are not in conflict with any of the clauses in the model document, as also the Rules, Regulations, Articles, Byelaws, circulars, directives and guidelines.
  • What is an Account Period Settlement?

    An account period settlement is a settlement where the trades pertaining to a period stretching over more than one day are settled. For example, trades for the period Monday to Friday are settled together. The obligations for the account period are settled on a net basis. Account period settlement has been discontinued since January 1, 2002, pursuant to SEBI directives.
  • What are DVR shares?

    What are DVR shares? 29 May 2012 at 11:00 am DVR or differential voting rights shares are like ordinary equity shares but with differential voting rights. Shares can have higher or lower voting rights as compared to the ordinary equity shares. However, Indian regulations do not permit companies to issue equity shares with higher voting rights. Hence, Indian DVR shares provide for lower voting rights as compared to ordinary equity shares.

    Companies issue DVRs for several reasons such as prevention of a hostile takeover, bringing in a passive strategic investor or dilution of voting rights. DVR investors are generally compensated with a higher dividend rate. This makes the DVRs attractive for retail investors who do not want control in the company, but are looking at the long-term growth prospects.

    DVR shares are listed on the stock exchanges and are traded in the same manner as ordinary equity shares, but they mostly trade at a discount, sometimes as high as 30%, due to fewer voting rights.

    Tata Motors, Gujarat NRE Coke, Pantaloon Retail, Jain Irrigation are some of the Indian companies that have issued DVR shares.

    E.g.: Tata Motors DVR shares carry voting rights which are one-tenth of the ordinary equity shares. The DVR shareholders are entitled to an additional 5% dividend, over and above the ordinary equity shareholders. Tata Motors DVR are trading at 800 or 36% discount to the ordinary shares, which are at trading at Rs 1,245 (as of 23rd November 2010).

    Source: sptulsian.com

stocks glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
  • Acid Test Ratio

    It is the ratio indicated by dividing a company\'s current assets by current liabilities. It reflects the financial strength of a company and hence called Acid test ratio.
  • Alpha

    Alpha measures the difference between a fund\'s actual returns and its expected performance, given its level of risk (as measured by beta). A positive alpha figure indicates the fund has performed better than its beta would predict. In contrast, a negative alpha indicates a fund has underperformed, given the expectations established by the fund\'s beta. Some investors see alpha as a measurement of the value added or subtracted by a fund\'s manager. There are limitations to alpha\'s ability to accurately depict a manager\'s added or subtracted value. In some cases, a negative alpha can result from the expenses that are present in the fund figures but are not present in the figures of the comparison index. Alpha is dependent on the accuracy of beta: If the investor accepts beta as a conclusive definition of risk, a positive alpha would be a conclusive indicator of good fund performance. Of course, the value of beta is dependent on another statistic, known as R-squared.
  • Annual Fund Operating Expenses

    The expenses incurred, during a particular year, by Asset Management Company for managing the funds.
  • Asset Allocation

    The process of diversifying the investments in different kinds of assets such as stocks, bonds, real estate, cash in order to optimize risk.
  • Asset Allocation Fund

    A fund that spreads its portfolio among a wide variety of investments, including domestic and foreign stocks and bonds, government securities, gold bullion and real estate stocks. Some of these funds keep the proportions allocated between different sectors relatively constant, while others alter the mix as market conditions change.
  • Asset Management Company (AMC)

    A Company registered with SEBI, which takes investment/divestment decisions for the mutual fund, and manages the assets of the mutual fund.
  • Automatic Investment Plan

    A plan offered by most mutual funds where a small fixed amount is automatically deducted monthly from an investor\'s bank account and invested in the mutual fund of their choice.
  • Automatic Reinvestment

    An investment option for mutual fund unit holders in which the proceeds from either the fund\'s dividends or capital gains, or both, are automatically used to buy more units of the funds.