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Faq

  • As a unitholder, how much time will it take to receive dividends/repurchase proceeds?

    A mutual fund is required to despatch to the unitholders the dividend warrants within 30 days of the declaration of the dividend and the redemption or repurchase proceeds within 10 working days from the date of redemption or repurchase request made by the unitholder.

    In case of failures to despatch the redemption/repurchase proceeds within the stipulated time period, Asset Management Company is liable to pay interest as specified by SEBI from time to time (15% at present).
  • How are mutual funds regulated?

    All Asset Management Companies (AMCs) are regulated by SEBI and/or the RBI (in case the AMC is promoted by a bank). In addition, every mutual fund has a board of directors that represents the unit holders interests in the mutual fund.
  • Can a mutual fund change the nature of the scheme from the one specified in the offer document?

    Yes. However, no change in the nature or terms of the scheme, known as fundamental attributes of the scheme e.g.structure, investment pattern, etc. can be carried out unless a written communication is sent to each unitholder and an advertisement is given in one English daily having nationwide circulation and in a newspaper published in the language of the region where the head office of the mutual fund is situated. The unitholders have the right to exit the scheme at the prevailing NAV without any exit load if they do not want to continue with the scheme. The mutual funds are also required to follow similar procedure while converting the scheme form close-ended to open-ended scheme and in case of change in sponsor.
  • What is Net Asset Value (NAV)?

    NAV is the total asset value (net of expenses) per unit of the fund and is calculated by the Asset Management Company (AMC) at the end of every business day. Net asset value on a particular date reflects the realisable value that the investor will get for each unit that he his holding if the scheme is liquidated on that date.
  • What are Tax-Saving Schemes?

    Tax-saving schemes offer tax rebates to the investors under tax laws prescribed from time to time. Under Sec.88 of the Income Tax Act, contributions made to any Equity Linked Savings Scheme (ELSS) are eligible for rebate @20% for a maximum investment on Rs10,000 per financial year.
  • What is the difference between an open-ended and close-ended scheme?

    Open-ended schemes can issue and redeem units any time during the life of the scheme while close-ended schemes cannot issue new units except in case of bonus or rights issue. Hence, the number of units of an open-ended scheme can fluctuate on a daily basis while that is not the case for close-ended schemes. Another way of explaining this difference is that new investors can join the scheme by directly applying to the mutual fund at applicable net asset value related prices in case of open-ended schemes while that is not the case in case of close-ended schemes, where new investors can buy the units from secondary market only
  • Ideally how many different schemes should one invest in?

    Don't just zero in on one mutual fund (to avoid the risk of being overly dependent on any one fund). Pick two, preferably three mutual funds that would match you investment objective in each asset allocation category and spread your investment. We recommend a 60:40 split if you have shortlisted 2 funds and a 40:30:30 split if you have short-listed 3 funds for investment.
  • How can the investors redress their complaints?

    Investors would find the name of contact person in the offer document of the mutual fund scheme whom they may approach in case of any query, complaints or grievances. Trustees of a mutual fund monitor the activities of the mutual fund. The names of the directors of asset management company and trustees are also given in the offer documents. Investors should approach the concerned Mutual Fund / Investor Service Centre of the Mutual Fund with their complaints,

    If the complaints remain unresolved, the investors may approach SEBI for facilitating redressal of their complaints. On receipt of complaints, SEBI takes up the matter with the concerned mutual fund and follows up with it regularly. Investors may send their complaints to:

    Securities and Exchange Board of India,
    Office of Investor Assistance and Education (OIAE)

    Plot No.C4-A , G Block, 1st Floor,
    Bandra-Kurla Complex,
    Bandra (E), Mumbai 400 051.
    Phone: 26449199-88-77
  • What are Gilt Funds?

    These funds invest exclusively in government securities. Government securities have no default risk. NAVs of these schemes also fluctuate due to change in interest rates and other economic factors as is the case with income or debt oriented schemes.
  • How to select a mutual fund?

    What's strategy got to do with selecting a mutual fund? Shouldn't you just go and invest in the best performing fund? The answer is no. Mutual fund investing requires as much strategic input as any other investment option. But the advantage is that the strategy here is a natural extension of your asset allocation plan (use our Asset Allocator to understand what your optimum asset allocation plan should be, based on your personal risk profile). moneycontrol recommends the following process:

mutual funds glossary

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
  • Acid Test Ratio

    It is the ratio indicated by dividing a company\'s current assets by current liabilities. It reflects the financial strength of a company and hence called Acid test ratio.
  • Alpha

    Alpha measures the difference between a fund\'s actual returns and its expected performance, given its level of risk (as measured by beta). A positive alpha figure indicates the fund has performed better than its beta would predict. In contrast, a negative alpha indicates a fund has underperformed, given the expectations established by the fund\'s beta. Some investors see alpha as a measurement of the value added or subtracted by a fund\'s manager. There are limitations to alpha\'s ability to accurately depict a manager\'s added or subtracted value. In some cases, a negative alpha can result from the expenses that are present in the fund figures but are not present in the figures of the comparison index. Alpha is dependent on the accuracy of beta: If the investor accepts beta as a conclusive definition of risk, a positive alpha would be a conclusive indicator of good fund performance. Of course, the value of beta is dependent on another statistic, known as R-squared.
  • Annual Fund Operating Expenses

    The expenses incurred, during a particular year, by Asset Management Company for managing the funds.
  • Asset Allocation

    The process of diversifying the investments in different kinds of assets such as stocks, bonds, real estate, cash in order to optimize risk.
  • Asset Allocation Fund

    A fund that spreads its portfolio among a wide variety of investments, including domestic and foreign stocks and bonds, government securities, gold bullion and real estate stocks. Some of these funds keep the proportions allocated between different sectors relatively constant, while others alter the mix as market conditions change.
  • Asset Management Company (AMC)

    A Company registered with SEBI, which takes investment/divestment decisions for the mutual fund, and manages the assets of the mutual fund.
  • Automatic Investment Plan

    A plan offered by most mutual funds where a small fixed amount is automatically deducted monthly from an investor\'s bank account and invested in the mutual fund of their choice.
  • Automatic Reinvestment

    An investment option for mutual fund unit holders in which the proceeds from either the fund\'s dividends or capital gains, or both, are automatically used to buy more units of the funds.